Q. I am suffering with new daily persistent headache. My headache began Jan. 21, 2012, and I have had it every day since. From what I have read, my situation is like others who have this condition. Medications do not seem to work, so I have continued to try new ones via a neurologist who specializes in headaches.  All tests are clear–MRI, MRA, MRV, CT scans, blood work and spinal tap. I have occasionally tried alternative methods–Botox, occipital nerve block, chiropractic care, naturopathy, Chinese herbalism, massage, yoga, Thai yoga therapy, none of which helped with the headache either. I have read that this can last from months to decades.  Is there any current information on the most successful approaches to make the headache go away?

By Edmund Messina, MD, Medical Director of the Michigan Headache Clinic in East Lansing, Michigan While headaches are typically thought to be located around the forehead or back of the head, there are types of headache that strike the face itself. Trigeminal neuralgia is a form of severe facial pain in which patients experience brief volleys of very painful electric shock sensations triggered by mild touch to the face or mouth. This touch can be from washing, shaving, eating, brushing the teeth or even talking. The trigger zones are particularly sensitive in the area between the nose and mouth or on the chin.

Exertional headaches are a group of headache syndromes, which are associated with some physical activity. These headaches typically become severe very quickly after a strenuous activity such as weight lifting or sexual intercourse. Exertional headaches can, in some instances, be a sign of abnormalities in...

An arteriovenous malformation is usually an inherited condition. It occurs when the brain arteries and veins are abnormally joined. It often goes undiscovered unless there is a specific reason for tests like CT scans, MRIs or, more selectively, MRA or angiograms. The Magnetic Resonance Angiogram...

This is a condition in which there is a weakness within an artery wall causing it to balloon out and sometimes rupture. In most cases involving the cerebral blood vessels these are present from birth and are asymptomatic and unrelated to migraine or other headaches.